B&N Opens Door of Opportunity

In the latest book industry news, Barnes & Noble has announced that it will be close more than 200 stores over the next decade. While some in the mass media are sure to see this as further evidence of their predictions that the printed book is dying, I see it as a smart corporate business decision that will open doors of opportunity for entrepreneurs.

Quaint places to gather, rest, and connect make a great community.

Quaint places to gather, rest, and connect make a great community.

For many of us who have spent time in corporate settings, the decision makes perfectly good sense. When big-box stores were all the rage, B&N seemed to be opening stores in communities large and small. Even into the ‘90s, those big boxes were filled with lots of books – not necessarily a greater selection of books within a subject category, but multiple copies of the same title just to fill all that shelf space. Because publishers offered quantity discounts and additional co-op funds, retailers like B&N got a better deal the more they bought. That not only resulted in a huge outlay of cash, but they often returned 30 to 40 percent of that stock (indies average 11 percent returns) when it didn’t sell through in a timely way. Imagine the labor costs of ordering, receiving, shelving, and returning books. Then add the freight costs.

Enter the 2008 economic crisis, followed by the growing acceptance of e-reading, and their retail strategy proved unsustainable. The company held long-term leases with suffocating overhead, and had devoted more and more space to marketing e-books, where the profit margin was considerably less than it is with print books. If ever there was a time to change course, this is it.
Without Borders and now with B&N exiting many markets, opportunities await the entrepreneur. The Pew research has shown that avid readers who read electronically are still buying an equal number of printed books. People still love to hang out in bookstores, because that’s where they discover great new books to read. In growing numbers, people are joining the “indie” movement and prefer to shop locally. Publishers and authors still need face time with readers. Consumers still long for meaningful “third places” to feel connected with others. Buying a book online makes it a commodity; but books are so much more than an addition to a shopping cart.
If you’ve dreamed of opening a bookstore, but have been scared away by the mass media yet again proclaiming that books and bookstores are dying, think again. Corporations who once dominated a niche market are now shifting their resources, leaving opportunities for indie entrepreneurs.

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