The Best of Book “Selling”

Most of us in the world of book selling don’t think of us as salespeople and that’s a good thing. While owners and managers are clear that the store doesn’t stay in business unless there are sales, inspiring a purchase (and making the numbers) happens in the most subtle ways in the bookstore. And the best booksellers don’t have the kinds of personalities we typically think of for people in sales.

A display of Ann Patchett's personal recommendations at Parnassus Books in Nashville, TN.

A display of Ann Patchett’s personal recommendations at Parnassus Books in Nashville, TN.

Last week while we were visiting Nashville, where in the late 1980s and early 1990s I managed the beloved Davis-Kidd Booksellers, we stopped into Parnassus to say “hello”, get some new photos, and shop. A conversation with Nathan, one of the Parnassus booksellers who previously worked for Joseph-Beth (the indie chain that purchased Davis-Kidd), led to my purchase of one more book … and was a reminder of what qualities make for a really great bookseller.

The conversation began when I picked up a copy of Marilynne Robinson’s newest novel Lila and commented to Nathan about how much my book group enjoyed Gilead. Nathan said he loved Robinson’s new book and then asked what other kinds of books I loved to read. When I explained that I absolutely adore reading “novels in letters” and thought Carlene Bauer’s Frances and Bernard did not get the notice it deserved, the heart of book selling magic began.

Nathan introduced me to the novel The Light and The Dark by a Russian author Mikhail Shishkin, a novel in letters! I’d never heard of this novelist and would not likely have discovered it on my own. Nathan went to get a copy of the book and placed it in my hands. And then he told me about the letters between the two characters, the historical background, and what makes the book memorable.

I added the book to my pile.

This is book selling at its greatest. One reader connects with another by asking questions, listening, sharing what they’ve read or know about that may be of interest.

Is it selling? Sure. But it’s mostly about caring about others and wanting to share the remarkable experience of reading a really great book.

Bravo, Parnassus! And thank you, Nathan.

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