Retail security experts have long said there are three sources why inventory disappears … external theft, internal theft, and errors. Physical inventories not only help a retailer confirm what’s on hand and in what quantities, it also helps get a glimpse on curious and problematic aspects of operations.

Last Sunday we conducted an early physical inventory so we could adopt a mid-year schedule. In Florida, summer has been a bit quieter than our first winter months. The last thing we need to do is celebrate the holiday shopping season and then count everything in the store on December 31st. So, we decided to get it done now, while inventory is lower and before we ramp up for the holidays.

Our retail space is approximately 2,400 square feet and we had eight of us working from 10 am until 6:30 pm to scan the inventory. Our computer systems vendor provided the scanners and instructions. We spent the week before getting organized and receiving everything before Sunday arrived.

With today’s technology, you can easily conduct your own physical inventory with your own staff. There are third party services you can employ, but it’s really not necessary to go outside since you’ll add extra time meeting them to explain your business.

On Monday morning, we began with an inventory that was correct, clear of receiving errors and corrected for “shrink”. During an author event earlier in the year, we knew a stack of books had disappeared, but we had no idea what else might have been stolen. The sobering fact is that even in small and safe communities, theft happens. Theft rings will even travel great distances for an opportunity.

The benefits of doing a physical inventory are many. We learn:

  • To correct item classification errors (books tagged for wrong sections) and ensure each new item brought into inventory has key fields properly coded
  • What processes need to be fine-tuned to ensure every item is costed properly
  • How to do mini audits throughout the year to keep the inventory accurate
  • What kinds of merchandise are most vulnerable for theft
  • What kinds of merchandise are most vulnerable for damage

Most importantly, we have a renewed commitment to shelving merchandise accurately and a new faith in our on-hand quantities … which is something we all appreciate each time we look for an item on the sales floor our system reports we have on hand.

When the cost of  inventory is the greatest cost of a bookstore, this annual count counts and is an essential step in managing the business.

It’s summer and that means time for vacation. Even though we have a permanent staff schedule, each week the schedule feels like a bowl of spaghetti with shift swaps happening left and right.

With our bookstore bistro we have further complexities … some booksellers also can work the cafe, but not all cafe staff can work the retail floor.

The aprons go on when we enter the store and we’re always ready to help out on the sales floor when necessary.

It would be lovely if coverage for all vacations, illnesses and surgeries, family visits, and special occasions could all magically work out. Unlike the 9-to-5 world, part-time staff will love working in the bookstore yet will always have something else as their number one priority. Opportunities for trips surface. Retirees can require a lot of time off to visit (or host) family and friends. College students sometimes can’t get the schedule they want at school and aren’t available when you need them most. Parents with children can have a slew of events they cannot miss. Then, cold and flu season hits.

The reality of owning a business is that in the end, it’s up to you to make sure all hours and tasks are covered. And some days, that’s easier said than done.

As we often work later than intended, cover shifts when we’d rather get back to business development, and spend more time arranging schedules, simply covering all of the open hours can be a challenge. And this can be a major factor for some who are thinking about the possibilities of owning a bookstore. If dropping everything for the business isn’t something you can do often, something will suffer as a result. In the end, we can understand why it’s so challenging to get to everything on our “To Do” list.

Ramping up a business to reach a level of revenue and net profit that allows you to build a core staff and even add some management-level positions. What a worthy goal that allows you to reclaim some of your time and be able to focus on the things that matter most to the sustainability of your business while the daily tasks get done.

Until then, long days where you are pulled in a variety of directions will be the norm. It’s exhausting. Yet unless you have unlimited funds to subsidize your start-up until you reach sustainability, most booksellers are moving fast and furiously, on their feet, constantly learning and juggling.

The glorious benchmark is to have even a handful of staff members who can take on important tasks so when it’s your time to take vacation, they’ll be the one filling in for you.

Bookselling is a unique profession in so many ways, but one that truly stands out is just how many people dream of having their own bookstore. We’re talking people spending years visualizing their bookstore, identifying books they’ll sell, and dreaming of the store filled with people who come to enjoy a heart-felt conversation.

This contribution to our inner lives and the inner lives of our neighbors and friends is one of the main reasons people get into the business. It’s also a big reason people choose to become booksellers after retiring from other careers.

Happy 20th anniversary to the river’s end bookstore in Oswego, New York!

One of our friends and colleagues in the book business is celebrating 20 years of being in business. The river’s end bookstore (yes, all lower case) in Oswego, New York was created by Bill Reilly who came to us when he had just retired from the New York world of magazine advertising. He was ready to relocate in upstate New York and begin a new chapter in his life.

Bookselling became his new career.

Since that moment, Bill has helped transform Oswego’s central business district in his corner space that makes a big impression when you drive into town. Bill added momentum and energy, enthusiasm and ideas to the business district. He has worked in collaboration with the university, local schools, and charitable organizations to help build community around books and ideas.

Twenty years ago, the space needed a real transformation since it was an historic building that had been used as a clothing store for years. I remember the shag carpeting, fitting rooms that needed to be demolished, and a drop-ceiling that was a throw-back to the ’70s when heating oil prices soared.

Bill wanted to have a beautiful bookstore that the locals would appreciate. He wanted to lift up the downtown district. He wanted to make a difference.

He certainly has accomplished this.

Bill’s wife Mindy joined the business after she retired from the university after working extra hours in the bookstore since it opened. Together, they have hosted authors, helped schools, worked with the university, and worked hard to live the dream.

Today, Bill and Mindy celebrate twenty years of bookselling and we are thrilled that their son Emile will carry on the tradition.

Bookselling, although demanding and challenging, can offer such rich rewards. For many, it starts with a dream and then can lead to making a difference. What a way to spend the next chapter in life.

Congratulations, Bill and Mindy and the booksellers at the river’s end bookstore! You have lived your dream in a beautiful way.

 

 

 

We’ve been wearing roller skates for months as first there was so much to do to launch the bookstore, now we’ve focused on shifting to organizing daily operations. Every day is over-flowing with things to do.

Mark and I have been thinking a lot about Tom Warner these last several weeks. Tom and his wife Vickie Crafton were one of our earliest trainees in the 1990s. After full careers in the textile industry, they purchased Litchfield Books. Tom said he wasn’t going to spend his retirement playing golf; he wanted something that would keep him invested in life. Each time we would see them at industry gatherings, Tom would ask us, “Why didn’t you tell me I’d have to work so hard?” Then, he’d add, “And I’ve never enjoyed my work as much as I do now.”

Tom died a few years ago and yet his stories live on. When we’ve come home exhausted from the day, we too acknowledge that there’s nothing else we’d rather be doing at this stage in our lives.

Here’s the counter-balancing moments to all of the administrative work:

  • children who draw us pictures or write notes on the blackboard in the play area
  • everyone who makes an effort to tell us and our crew just how much they love the store and how glad they are we have opened
  • when customers make the bookstore a stop for visiting friends and family
  • customers on the other side of the county who purchase from our website because they want to support a local business
  • our amazing crew who are over-qualified and beautifully devoted to making Story & Song a friendly and welcoming place
  • customers who tell us they found out about the store from a friend, hairdresser, or neighbor
  • 130+ people who show up to listen to and sing along with the local ukulele band
  • a sell-out concert two weeks before Harpeth Rising arrived to do our grand opening finale
  • a staged reading of “Looking For Normal” which prompted everyone to ask big-picture questions about society and our own biases
  • children who love telling us about what they like to read
The Kooks, our local ukulele band, drew a standing-room-only crowd. People want connection and community.

The Kooks, our local ukulele band, drew a standing-room-only crowd. People want connection and community.

We are tracking above our sales projections, yet we’re still working relentlessly to fill the events calendar with reasons people should come into the store. Buying the opening inventory was one huge project and now we are working hard to transition into buying new releases for the coming months. Every day the interruptions keep us from getting things done, but saying “hello” to a customer who has come in with a neighbor is too important to miss.

In the next blogs we’ll be writing more about what we’ll call the “transition period” … the time when you’re switching between opening the store to operating the store. It’s another unique chapter on this path of developing a sustainable bookstore business.

Yet in the meantime, it’s important to take off the roller skates, stop, and breathe in the sweet moments that enrich each day in the bookstore.

It’s the week of Thanksgiving and I welcome the opportunity to take a deep breath from the long list of things that still need to be done before launching Story & Song Neighborhood Bookstore Bistro.

Today I was at the shop while the electrician was wrapping up. Dan worked a very long day, was covered in dust from the acoustic tiles and sheetrock, and was ready to embark on a 40 minute drive back home. Yet he took a moment to let me know a few things about the audio lines, then to tell me just what a “cool thing you’re doin’ here.”

Small Business Saturday Banner jpeg

I’m grateful for:

Dan and the fact that he’s telling others about this bookstore where you can come listen to music.

Our contractors showing up during a holiday week.

Our banker gave us an update today and said how much she was excited about seeing the bookstore once all of the renovations are completed.

Successful electronic order transmissions to both book wholesalers for our pop-up bookshop this Saturday.

David Sax, author of The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter, and his wonderful piece in Sunday’s New York Times, “Our Love Affair With Digital Is Over.”

My colleagues, the good souls who own independent bookstores

The countless members of the community who have gone out of their way to tell us how thrilled they are that we’re opening a bookstore, then ask when we’ll be open.

Small Business Saturday

Thanksgiving

And I’m grateful to have Mark as my partner in life and in business. It makes a difference when you have support for your values and priorities.

If you’ve embarked on a dream to open a bookstore, may you always take a moment to refresh your energy by taking note of the reasons to be thankful for the opportunity to do something rewarding and enriching with your time, energy, resources, and talent.

Booksellers who know we’ve helped people in the start-up phase for years have asked what we are discovering about the process now that we’re in the midst of our own start-up.

One thing requires two others be prepared in advance. It can feel like a wild maze.

One thing requires two others be prepared in advance. It can feel like a wild maze.

Mark and I comment every day, “why is this so hard?”

Everything seems to need to be done at least twice, especially if the government is involved.

Don’t get me wrong, I am very much an advocate for the many things that are done for the collective good. But yesterday, Mark and I both were ready to pull our hair out over what should have been crossing one simple thing off our list.

After delivering a few orders to the Post Office, we decided to drive forty-five minutes into Jacksonville to get an electronic fingerprint for our alcohol license application. Our first attempt, in our own County was thwarted when even though the sign read, “Electronic Finger Prints $10 each,” they don’t do the kind of fingerprints we need. “You have to go to Jacksonville for that.”

So, we after checking online to see where to go, we decided to use our afternoon to finally get this done. When we found the address, we parked, fed the parking meter, then ascended the 20 steps to the front entrance to read the sign that read, “Closed, please use Liberty Street entrance”. So we got back in the car drove around a very big block, navigated the parking lot, fed the other meter, and went inside.

After telling the officer at the front desk of the Police Station we were here for fingerprinting for an alcohol license, he said “They’re closed. Veterans Day.” I replied, “It’s not Veterans Day.” He said, “They’re closed. Veterans Day.”

Nothing on the website indicated they’d be closed that day. Since the Post Office and the banks were open, we thought we could quickly fit this in and get it done. Nope.

So, we decided to visit the new IKEA store since we’d driven all the way into the city. I’m still trying to process that experience and will write about it at some point.

In the meantime, the fingerprints task is still on the “To Do” list for next week, which is necessary before we can submit our business license. The workman’s comp insurance policy is in place, the business insurance policy is too. Both are needed for the overall business license application, which should be submitted with the sign permit application.

And, we’re not even located in the historic district, where there is another list of prerequisites.

Good thing we’ve got a nice supply of strong coffee. We’ll have a full pot going Monday morning. But we’re not going to Jacksonville on Monday, it’s Veterans Day weekend still. Better wait.

 

If you’ve been following the business news on the many retail store and chain closings in this first part of the year, it may seem like good news for start-ups, but not so much.

Live music sponsored by the Centre Street merchants of historic Fernandina Beach, FL

Live music sponsored by the Centre Street merchants of historic Fernandina Beach, FL

The closings still appear to be about two main shifts: 1) away from big-box footprints, and 2) and to online shopping for products that can be considered commodities.

Are books commodities today? Well, to some people … those who know what they want, want it fast, want it at the best available price, and don’t value the in-store experience of shopping in a bricks-and-mortar bookstore.

Yet the competitive advantages for indie bookstores is generally about a thought-filled selection, staff recommendations, mindful displays, events, and that special feeling of being in a sanctuary for those who read, value local businesses and their contributions to culture and the local economy.

Indie bookstores tend to do best in Main Street destinations, not big-box developments and strip malls. These are quaint villages and clusters of cafes and shops that offer unique merchandise and a delightful browsing experience. These are places people love to linger, meet up with friends, and enjoy the moment. Their rents tend to be higher because they are tend to always in demand.

So, while the new vacancies in malls and strip centers are many, the over demand will likely not push rents lower in Main Street locations.

It’s still true that much of a retailer’s success is about location. While the big-box spiral down continues, this is an opportunity for Main Street merchants to regain local business by showing there are a lot of things you simply cannot get while shopping online.

You, too might be getting these calls … they begin with a woman who, for the first few seconds, seems real, even likable.

She has a little giggle and wants to know if you’re on the line. She sounds like she could be you neighbor or maybe your hairdresser calling to confirm your appointment. But, then you realize the voice was carefully crafted and is recorded.

Networks of computers make calls and capture customer information in today's world of digital marketing.

Networks of computers make calls and capture customer information in today’s world of digital marketing.

Mark and I both have been on the receiving end of these calls lately. Initially, they are amusing, until you realize you’ve been tricked. Telemarketing has never really had a great reputation, but with a large volume of calls, the response must be enough to keep them calling. What a way to do business.

Companies are investing big money in technology to form customer relationships. It seems our business executives are enthralled with technology and all that it can do. It feels a bit like the era when IT consultants told publishers the future was in electronic books. Money and attention from traditional channels were redirected towards technology. The initial response was promising, then the sexiness wore off. Many readers have already returned to the authentic, real, printed book.

I think of the executive who is skeptical about the focus on technology, but likely over-ruled by the technology believers at the board room table. When so much of our lives already involve gadgets and screens, will people grow to prefer immediate, perfect automated responses to human interaction? Or, will we search for some level of human interaction with others who are not family, co-workers, or neighbors?

Marketing now encompasses a growing number of strategies. In the end, it’s our decision about what is best for our type of business and what feels appropriate for our customers. An ad in the community theatre’s program, your personal letter to customers in your store’s newsletter, your contributions to social media, personal conversations with customers in the store … a valuable mix for today’s world.

Like most of life, balance is best. And in bookselling, still skewed towards authentic, not recorded, connections.

Our work has become even more clear during this presidential campaign. We need to step up our advocacy for the values and qualities that make us decent human beings who contribute to the greater good of the world.

Yesterday, as I was preparing dinner, I listened and watched Michelle Obama’s comments during a campaign presentation. She was right, this was not the time for a typical speech. These are not normal times.

Our work grows more important.

Our work grows more important.

Over the summer, I’ve been reading the publications from the Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization that is “dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry and seeking justice for the most vulnerable of our society.” For years they’ve produced a publication entitled Teaching Tolerance. The letters from teachers, Q&A responses about challenging situations emanating from this campaign season, and the heightened concerns teachers have for children has been chilling. Stories of playground behavior and language illustrate that children see, hear, and are affected.

On TV and radio, children have heard the spewing of hateful, disrespectful language and incitement of violence. And, we as adults have needed to discuss this because it is simply unbelievably surprising and sad.

We are better than this.

The effort needed to counter-balance these destructive words seems to grow in importance with each new day of the campaign.

Booksellers have a perfect audience with every story time and an opportunity with each little customer. I grew up with Captain Kangaroo and remember learning to say “please” and “thank you” and saw how a captain in a big mustache would be kind and civil with a little bunny rabbit. My storybooks taught me those same lessons.

The work to right this ship is immediate and probably ongoing. The media will need to continue to report the news, but we can work to be models and safe havens of civility and respect.

Last week, thirty people representing twenty new independent bookstores gathered for Bookstore Boot Camp. Most were in the planning stages. Some were exploring whether bookselling would be the right next step in their careers. All of us were deep into the business of bookselling.

Author Jeff Kinney inspires the newest indie bookstore owners during Bookstore Boot Camp.

Author Jeff Kinney inspires the newest indie bookstore owners during Bookstore Boot Camp.

We took the Bookstore Boot Camp on the road this time, traveling to Massachusetts to take a field trip to An Unlikely Story, the bookstore opened in 2015 by Jeff Kinney, author of the fabulously popular Wimpy Kid series. Also, the retailer that won the Specialty Store Silver Design Award from the Association for Retail Environments.

We expected this would be a special Boot Camp, but you never can actually predict the magic of the moment.

After touring An Unlikely Story by Deb Sundin, the store’s General Manager, we were invited up to Jeff Kinney’s studio where he welcomed us to “Wimpy World”. All of us delighted in seeing the life-size graphics from the Wimpy Kid series and the colorful and creative space where Jeff writes, draws, and navigates the worlds of book publishing, film-making, playwriting, licensed products, and now, bookselling.

We had entered a place where children are honored and the biggest success is defined as the time when a child learns to read for the fun of it. Given the millions of Wimpy Kid books that have sold in dozens of languages around the world, Jeff has enriched many lives.

As we were winding down our visit and Jeff congratulated everyone and wished them well, he offered these heart-felt words: “there’s nothing more sacred than putting a book into a kid’s hands.”

Heads nodded, “Yes”.

Later in the week when we were wrapping up the workshop and discussing our next steps, our youngest colleague … a twenty-something who said she came because she wasn’t clear what to do with her career … said she’d found clarity: Bookselling.

Success can be defined in so many ways. In bookselling, success is often measured by finding your tribe and performing sacred acts.