Like many others who a part of a book group, my book group has become a vital part of my life. Having spent decades in the book business, it’s also been a fascinating portal into not only what others love to read (and why), but to see how they prefer to read.

Over the last decade, I’ve seen several of my book group friends switch to e-books. Each month, I bring my print volume.

The feel of a book creates a different kind of reading experience.

The feel of a book creates a different kind of reading experience.

This week, one of the e-book pioneers told me she’d recently read a printed book and is going back to print. “What is it that is drawing you back to print?,” I ask. Without specifics, my friend and neighbor explains that, “it’s a totally different reading experience … it’s more real and it’s simply a better experience than reading on a screen.”

Even though she has all of the Amazon perks from being a long-time Kindle user, she’s limiting her e-book reading to travel. Otherwise, she’s going back to print and buying those books at our local indie bookstore, who hosts my neighbor’s knitting group.

The IT professionals forecasted that e-books would be the dominant format by now. What clouded the judgment was the fascination with technology as innovations were radically changing our lives. Now, there’s been time and space to compare both experiences. And, people are choosing what feels best and most rewarding.

With a six percent growth in unit sales January through June of this year versus 2015, my neighbor is not alone. Reading is more than accessing type immediately.

Print books are a beautiful invitation to shut out the distractions that surround us and enjoy the weight of a good story or immerse ourselves in the topic we choose.

Not that readers who have been reading e-books will choose to return completely to print, but readers are acknowledging the reading experience is different … and better … with print.

Publishers Weekly does such a good job in reporting on research that affects the book industry and their recent snapshot on today’s educational e-book market prompted me to think about how the results will affect the sale of print books in bookstores as students become familiar with using e-books.

Children may regard ebooks like parents regard computer screens: work.

Children may regard ebooks like parents regard computer screens: work.

Quoting from the 2014 School Library Journal “Survey of E-book Usage in Schools,” PW notes that 66% of schools across the country currently offer e-books, a 10% increase over the previous year. The portion of children who have read at least one e-book has increased steadily over the last five years.

There are issues galore that the educational community are grappling with: the digital divide; the cost of ongoing investments in technology, tech support, and staff training; selecting and sourcing e-books; plus providing the format that is best for the student and the subject being taught.

If we look to the future, it appears that the number of ways we can read will expand. Being able to read has always been important to success in life, now technical skills will be needed to access information.

It’s interesting that booksellers whose spouses work for Apple and Facebook note that families with roots in the field want their children to read print. They want their children to be well-rounded and able to focus on reading without distraction. Many limit “screen time” and look for ways to maintain a healthy attention span when there are many temptations for digital escape.

What will the students of today prefer as they age? My call is that those who have a balanced diet of reading electronically and reading in print will be proficient in researching and skimming information as needed for tasks. When it comes to reading for fun, turning the pages of a print book will be a break from technology, offering a sensory experience during those cherished moments for quiet adventure.

Saturday marked the inaugural Storytime Day and independent booksellers across the country partnered with children’s book authors and illustrators to host events in bookstores across the country.

The stories and photos were precious … children engaged their imaginations as adults read out loud to them so that they could go on the journeys together.

When we conduct our workshops, it’s a common experience that people who want to open a bookstore will be challenged by family members, friends, and colleagues who learn about their dream. Some think the printed book is dead (not) or dying (nope).

The inaugural StoryTime Day promotes the importance of reading together.

The inaugural StoryTime Day promotes the importance of reading together.

As skeptics learn that print is still the vast majority of book sales (about 80%) and that even the IT consultants now are backing off their predictions and see that maybe ebooks will level off at 30% of the book business, some ask, “but what about the children who are being brought up on gadgets?”

Of course time will tell, but when I look at how children still love reading bedtime stories and that reading is a tactile experience, I find it hard to believe that many children won’t grow up to see and appreciate the difference.

There is no doubt that the presence of a bookstore will also be a factor for children and families. When a community has a bookstore with story time and offers the opportunity to come look, hold, and enjoy wonderful books, the appreciation for reading and for the printed book will continue.