Retail security experts have long said there are three sources why inventory disappears … external theft, internal theft, and errors. Physical inventories not only help a retailer confirm what’s on hand and in what quantities, it also helps get a glimpse on curious and problematic aspects of operations.

Last Sunday we conducted an early physical inventory so we could adopt a mid-year schedule. In Florida, summer has been a bit quieter than our first winter months. The last thing we need to do is celebrate the holiday shopping season and then count everything in the store on December 31st. So, we decided to get it done now, while inventory is lower and before we ramp up for the holidays.

Our retail space is approximately 2,400 square feet and we had eight of us working from 10 am until 6:30 pm to scan the inventory. Our computer systems vendor provided the scanners and instructions. We spent the week before getting organized and receiving everything before Sunday arrived.

With today’s technology, you can easily conduct your own physical inventory with your own staff. There are third party services you can employ, but it’s really not necessary to go outside since you’ll add extra time meeting them to explain your business.

On Monday morning, we began with an inventory that was correct, clear of receiving errors and corrected for “shrink”. During an author event earlier in the year, we knew a stack of books had disappeared, but we had no idea what else might have been stolen. The sobering fact is that even in small and safe communities, theft happens. Theft rings will even travel great distances for an opportunity.

The benefits of doing a physical inventory are many. We learn:

  • To correct item classification errors (books tagged for wrong sections) and ensure each new item brought into inventory has key fields properly coded
  • What processes need to be fine-tuned to ensure every item is costed properly
  • How to do mini audits throughout the year to keep the inventory accurate
  • What kinds of merchandise are most vulnerable for theft
  • What kinds of merchandise are most vulnerable for damage

Most importantly, we have a renewed commitment to shelving merchandise accurately and a new faith in our on-hand quantities … which is something we all appreciate each time we look for an item on the sales floor our system reports we have on hand.

When the cost of  inventory is the greatest cost of a bookstore, this annual count counts and is an essential step in managing the business.

When it comes to retail business, few companies find themselves involved in social and political issues like bookstores. The latest issue has been a response to North Carolina’s HB2 known as the NC “bathroom bill”. North Carolina has not protected workers who are LGBT and has language in HB2 that clarifies that the state does not intend to create a new class of protections based on sexual identity … and will not allow its cities and counties to create such a protected class.

We Are Not ThisAuthors have cancelled book tour stops in North Carolina and booksellers around the state have banned together to proclaim “we believe it is essential to be non-discriminatory, inclusive and tolerant, to promote freedom of speech and equality, and to guard against censorship and unfair treatment.”

Many of the beloved picture books we carry encourage respecting differences, actually embracing them. Our world becomes bigger and more compassionate when we don’t judge, bully, and isolate others.

The North Carolina booksellers are standing strong in their statement to their elected officials. They have a lot to lose in terms of their financial sustainability and ability to continue to provide safe spaces where people can gather and discuss issues, grow into their higher selves, and contribute to the evolution of humanity.

Bookstores are symbols of civility, education, lifelong learning, connection, and conversation. We celebrate the freedom to read, diversity and inclusivity.

Today, we in the book industry are shocked and saddened to see our colleagues in North Carolina battling for human rights in 2016 … in the United States of America. We can learn from the civil rights movement and all of those children’s books too. We stand with the North Carolina booksellers and believe we are better than this.

I guess it all started with my mom, a single mother raising two girls without a lot of resources, she learned to fix things. The local hardware stores, like local bookshops, were pressed to show their competitive advantages when the big box stores multiplied in towns everywhere.

Hackney Hardware in Dexter, Michigan - what a delightful experience!

Hackney Hardware in Dexter, Michigan – what a delightful experience!

Today, I love going to not just any hardware store, I love ACE Hardware stores. While in the Ann Arbor area recently, I visited Hackney ACE Hardware in Dexter Michigan. The stores are independently owned and operated and while they vary in their selection, all the ACE Hardware stores I’ve visited seem to show friendliness you can only find in a neighborhood business.

While I was walking along Main Street in Dexter, I came across a storefront with kitchen goods and toys visible from the sidewalk. Hold everything! I went in and headed right for the beautiful tabletop display. Where am I?

When I peaked around the corner, I could see I’d entered the hardware from a second entrance. I stumbled into a feature display of absorbent dish cloths. Some were imported and others were hand-crocheted with all cotton yarn. There were natural cleaning solutions for every household chore on an endocarp display. I’d never seen the brand before.

Near the cash wrap was a wall display of favorite soda pop and on the cash wrap counter was a display of Chuckles, those sugared jelly candies. How fabulous is that?!

The store was clean. The staff was friendly. The merchandise ranged from staples to wonderful discoveries. I found a few things to buy.

After my friends found me in Hackney Hardware and we were ready to press on, we walked and discovered a barber shop at the corner. The barber was inside cutting hair and talking with a few other men.

What a delightful experience on Main Street. When I’m in Dexter, I’m going back to Hackney’s Hardware.

This month we were fortunate to get to an item that’s been on our “Bucket List” for some time … visiting New Zealand. You might recall that the city of Christchurch had a nasty earthquake in 2011. Homes, churches, and businesses were severely damaged and tourism stopped.

Christchurch is on the rebound and the future now looks exciting as the city and the people have taken a mindful approach on how to rebuild.

In the meantime, the shops and restaurants are open!

Scorpio Books was among the retailers and restaurant owners to re-open after the earthquake - in a shipping container.

Scorpio Books was among the retailers and restaurant owners to re-open after the earthquake – in a shipping container.

We visited Re-START, a brilliantly conceived outdoor retail space consisting of temporary buildings made from shipping containers. When you walk into one of the shops you’d just think you were in a small space … the walls are painted, light fixtures are up, the HVAC works, and it’s business as usual.

Restaurants were serving people who were seated at bistro tables inside containers and on surrounding space.

The whole idea lends itself to authentic charm. Make lemonade out of those lemons!

Visiting Re-START is a reminder that especially after a catastrophe, we need places to gather, eat, and shop. Cafes and shops are symbols of normalcy; they are places people crave when their worlds have been turned upside down.

Small businesses have always been known for their resiliency, and the Kiwis proved that great new ideas can come from necessity.